#luxuryworldtraveller

Sunny Mykonos best place to enjoy your weekend. How is your weekend?
Sunny Mykonos best place to enjoy your weekend. How is your weekend?
Listen to some new fresh beats by our new resident DJs today! We Run The World ladies night and day every Sunday from noon onwards, AED 50 for 5 selected bevs plus 30% off on our new food menu!⠀
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#dubairestaurants #dubailadiesday
Listen to some new fresh beats by our new resident DJs today! We Run The World ladies night and day every Sunday from noon onwards, AED 50 for 5 selected bevs plus 30% off on our new food menu!⠀

#dubairestaurants #dubailadiesday
Artist: Yoshitoshi Tsukioka (1839 – 1892)
Title: Mount Yoshino midnight-moon, Iga no Tsubone
Series: Tsuki Hyakushi (One Hundred Aspects of the Moon)
Publisher: Akiyama Buemon
Date: 1886

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon is Yoshitoshi's one of the most popular series. It contains one hundred woodblock prints depicting various, unrelated figures from Japanese and Chinese culture, with the moon as its unifying theme.

The print depicts the ghost of Sasaki no Kiyotaka, who was forced to commit suicide by the Emperor Go-Daigo in Kyoto. His ill-considered political advice had led to the refuge of the Emperor to a temporary palace. Kiyotaka's ghost followed and terrorised the court-in-exile. The only one who dared to oppose him was fearless Iga no Tsubone. She was said to enable another escape of the Emperor by falling a tree to bridge a ravine. Here, she stands in front of the blue-lipped ghost, her long hair flowing in the fashion of the period. Determined enough, the court lady forces him to vanish forever.
Artist: Yoshitoshi Tsukioka (1839 – 1892)
Title: Mount Yoshino midnight-moon, Iga no Tsubone
Series: Tsuki Hyakushi (One Hundred Aspects of the Moon)
Publisher: Akiyama Buemon
Date: 1886

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon is Yoshitoshi's one of the most popular series. It contains one hundred woodblock prints depicting various, unrelated figures from Japanese and Chinese culture, with the moon as its unifying theme.

The print depicts the ghost of Sasaki no Kiyotaka, who was forced to commit suicide by the Emperor Go-Daigo in Kyoto. His ill-considered political advice had led to the refuge of the Emperor to a temporary palace. Kiyotaka's ghost followed and terrorised the court-in-exile. The only one who dared to oppose him was fearless Iga no Tsubone. She was said to enable another escape of the Emperor by falling a tree to bridge a ravine. Here, she stands in front of the blue-lipped ghost, her long hair flowing in the fashion of the period. Determined enough, the court lady forces him to vanish forever.

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